The Student News Site of Wilde Lake High School

The Paw Print

The Student News Site of Wilde Lake High School

The Paw Print

The Student News Site of Wilde Lake High School

The Paw Print

Renato Serrano, 10th grade, El Salvador

Renato+Serrano+and+his+mom+photographed+in+El+Salvador.+They+moved+to+Florida+when+Renato+was+10+because+his+mom+received+a+job+opportunity.+Renato+moved+with+his+mom+and+two+brothers.
Renato Serrano
Renato Serrano and his mom photographed in El Salvador. They moved to Florida when Renato was 10 because his mom received a job opportunity. Renato moved with his mom and two brothers.

At just ten years old, sophomore Renato Serrano left the life he knew in El Salvador.

Renato left his dad and his grandma in El Salvador when he moved to Florida in the fifth grade. He flew to America with his two brothers and his mom, who had received a new job opportunity.

When Renato arrived in Florida, he couldn’t speak English. He was put into the ESOL program, but he says he worked to learn English himself. “In Florida, they don’t really teach you anything,” he said.

Although Renato can speak English now, being a native Spanish speaker came with its struggles.

“In middle school, it was hard to make friends because I didn’t really speak the language,” he said. “Same thing at home. I couldn’t do my homework because I didn’t understand.”

Renato moved to Maryland the summer before his freshman year after learning English on his own throughout elementary and middle school.

Upon arriving in Maryland, Renato was still in ESOL. “In my freshman year, they put me in that class, but I wanted to take a test [to get out],” he said, believing he had learned enough English to no longer need the classes. Renato successfully completed the test and has not been in ESOL since.

At Wilde Lake, Renato says he feels for the students who currently struggle with learning English. “In this school, when I see kids who don’t speak English, it reminds me of myself,” he said.

Although Renato identifies with his Salvadorian culture, sometimes he wishes he was born in America so his life would have been “easier.”

But, Renato still feels a connection to his Salvadorian identity. “I say I’m from El Salvador because I was born there. I still have some friends there, and my family is still there,” he said.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Paw Print
$60
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Wilde Lake High School. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Paw Print
$60
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

Start the conversation. The Paw Print staff has the right to delete and/or edit any submissions.
All The Paw Print Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *